Evosep webinar

Rapid detection of antimicrobial resistance with the Evosep One

Wed May 25th 2022  I  4:00 pm CET

Antimicrobial resistance is a steadily increasing global problem threatening the effective prevention and treatment of an increasing range of infections. The development of antimicrobial resistance is limiting the number of antibiotics that can be used to successfully treat infections leaving a large proportion of all antimicrobials prescribed to human patients unnecessary.

Therefore, new and rapid methods for the identification of bacteria species and their antimicrobial resistance mechanisms are needed.

In this webinar, you can meet users from this research area and learn about how they have implemented the Evosep One for their fast workflows.

SPEAKERS

 

USING LC-MS/MS TO RAPIDLY DETECT ANTIMICROBIAL RESISTANCE MECHANISMS IN E. COLI AND K. PNEUMONIAE

Talk by Dimard Foudraine, Researcher, Erasmus MC, Medical Microbiology & Infectious Diseases

New accurate and rapid diagnostic tools are required to detect antimicrobial resistance. At the Erasmus MC, we developed a workflow to rapidly detect antimicrobial resistance mechanisms in the bacteria E. coli and K. pneumoniae using the Evosep One and an Orbitrap mass spectrometer.

By only detecting conserved and specific peptides, phenotypic resistance of bacteria can be predicted within a few hours after bacterial growth.

ULTRAFAST BACTERIAL IDENTIFICATION IN URINARY TRACT INFECTIONS USING HIGH-THROUGHPUT PROTEOMICS AND ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE

TALK BY FLORENCE ROUX DALVAI, RESEARCH ASSISTANT, CHU QUÉBEC, LAVAL UNIVERSITY

Identification of bacterial species responsible for Urinary Tract infections (UTIs) relies on a long step of bacterial culture (24-48h) prior to MALDI-TOF analysis. During this time, patients receive broad-spectrum antibiotics which increase the occurrence of new bacterial resistances in the whole population.

Here, we demonstrate that ultrafast LC-MSMS-DIA analyses (5 min) and automated learning algorithms can be combined to discriminate among the bacterial species the most commonly found in UTIs with a high accuracy and without the need of a bacterial culture.